Many exciting dive sites are located in deeper water. Without proper training, this kind of diving puts you at risk. The SSI Deep Diving Specialty will give you the ability to safely and comfortably plan and conduct dives beyond 18 meters, and is a prerequisite for some advanced training. You will earn the SSI Deep Diving Specialty certification. 

The Indy Dive Center is dedicated to provide one of the most exciting Deep Diver courses available.  Not only will you learn deep diving, but you'll also join us for a day of diving Three of the Great Lakes favorite shipwrecks and a box lunch!  Does not include transportation, parking or accommodations.

Price includes Box Lunch & 3 Shipwreck Dives in the Great Lakes

The Buccaneer

The Buccaneer is a 100 foot long patrol boat with a 23 foot beam that served from 1925 to 1936. This was one of 13 patrol boats armed with a 23-caliber gun constructed for the U.S. Coast Guard to be used against rum runners in the Great Lakes and the Gulf of Mexico. After the ships retirement from patrolling the waters, it ended its working career as a pirate-themed charter craft that could be hired anytime for a party by calling 1-800-PARTY-BOAT. The Buccaneer has been sunk and now rests below 72 feet of water 10 miles off Chicago. Sunk: June 18, 2010 Depth: 72 Feet

The Rotarian

The Rotarian was built in 1889 in Sandusky, Ohio. It was approximately 147 feet long with a beam of 27 feet. The vessel spent many years as a passenger excursion ship. When it moved to Chicago in the 1920’s, this aging vessel was used successively as a dance hall, the home of the Cook County Democrats, and as a restaurant that offered illegal bootleg alcohol during Prohibition. Even Al Capone entertained on this ship. After sinking at its dock, the Rotarian was raised and towed out into Lake Michigan on Sept. 28, 1931, and scuttled. The wreck lies at 84 feet with much to see: boiler, the collapsed hull, its propeller, and, amidst the hull timbers, numerous beer bottles from Prohibition days. Sunk: September 28, 1931 Depth: 80-84 Feet

The Straits Of Mackinac

The historic Great Lakes steamship STRAITS OF MACKINAC arrived in Chicago on Tuesday June 25th, from Kewaunee Wisconsin. Slated to be sunk at a location Northeast of Navy Pier as an artificial reef and recreational site for scuba divers. The purpose of sinking the 200 foot long coal-fired car ferry is to increase recreational tourism to Chicago and also by providing an attractive habitat for perch, bass and other native species. The ship will enhance Chicago’s sport fishing industry and add a new, intact shipwreck that will make the Straits of Mackinac the first substantial wreck in Chicago waters since 1929. The purpose of sinking the 200 foot long coal-fired car ferry is to increase recreational tourism to Chicago and also by providing an attractive habitat for perch, bass and other native species. The ship will enhance Chicago’s sport fishing industry and add a new, intact shipwreck that will make the Straits of Mackinac the first substantial wreck in Chicago waters since 1929. Sunk: April 10, 2003 Depth: 42-80 Feet

How to get started...

Step 1. Create your free diver profile with SSI. This only needs to be completed if you are not affiliated with the Indy Dive Center. Click on the SSI Online Registration link located above.

Step 2. Pay for your Perfect Buoyancy Class. Click on the Pay Online link located above.

Step 3. Download the the SSI digital application for your smart device. No need to download the application if you already have it installed. Android Download or IOS Download

What Next???

The Indy Dive Center is notified that you have completed your SSI Online Registration and purchased your Scuba Diving Course. We'll then activate the course, making it available to proceed with the academic portion of your training. Your instructor will contact you to answer any questions and to get you on your way to completing the SSI dive course.

Please feel free to contact your instructor with any questions as you work through your course.

Prerequisites

  • Must be at least 10 years old
  • Have completed an Open Water Diver course
  • Comfortable in the water